What the National Child Measurement Programme Missed

By December 18, 2018Uncategorized

The National Child Measurement Programme (NCMP) is a boring name for what is actually a huge and extremely useful annual survey. It contains measurements taken in schools for Reception and Year 6 children and is published by NHS Digital annually. This year is the first time they’ve identified children with severe obesity (>99.6 centile) and there are some shocking figures for Sheffield.

  • 21.2% of Reception year schoolchildren are now obese. That’s 0.5% higher than the previous year, and above the national average of 20%.
  • 35.6% of Year 6 pupils in the city are either overweight or obese and 4.97% of these children are severely obese – compared with a national average of 4.07 per cent.
  • At the time of the survey there were 40,724 children in Sheffield aged 6-11, which means that 2,023 children on this ratio are severely obese.
  • And there were 36,472 children in Sheffield aged 12-17 so 1,812 of children in this age bracket could be severely obese. What’s even more worrying is that these children are not included in NCMP measures.

Many of these young people would benefit from specialist Tier 3 services like ours but we can only see 200 families a year! Providing services for these children would have a major impact on the health budget, which is perhaps one of the reasons why these services are not currently funded. But that’s a lot of children and young people who are being left behind.

This survey proves there’s a substantial proportion of children who fit the criteria for interventions for ‘severe’ level of obesity. In fact the children we’re seeing at SHINE are above +3 and +4, which is even higher.

But what services will be available for children like those in this report whose weight poses significant health risks?

Alongside services provision, the main thing we’d like to see here is more information. There are no measures as yet for young people once they enter secondary school. NCMP measures stop at Year 6 so after that children are not measured at any other stage of their childhood life. We know obesity increases with age so measuring children again after this age is crucial. We agree with Tam Fry at the National Obesity Forum who is pushing for children to be measured every school year as they used to be in the past – early intervention is paramount to prevent children needing Tier 3 services.

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